Soldier S Home Theme Essay Question

Certainly one of the topics that come to mind and stand out resonate in the story's title as they do in our own lives: adaptation. Here is a  man who has gone through a life-changing event and has allegedly experienced a series of consequences caused by his own choices. As a result, he has to choose how to re-adapt himself to understanding a life, as he knew it, all over again.

With understanding life again...

Certainly one of the topics that come to mind and stand out resonate in the story's title as they do in our own lives: adaptation. Here is a  man who has gone through a life-changing event and has allegedly experienced a series of consequences caused by his own choices. As a result, he has to choose how to re-adapt himself to understanding a life, as he knew it, all over again.

With understanding life again comes a re-birth of mind and consciousness; of reality and truth. He has to re-visit all his value-system, his own mental substenance, traditions, and schema of life and transfer all that towards a new scheme that, in itself, is also new to him. It is hard to imagine being part of a world, then being taken to another, and then being returned to the original world from where you came and -suddenly- it is now completely incomprehensible to you. It is like two zones of reality continuously multiplying without control.

The need to understand, adapt, re-do, revisit, reinstate, and re-start are certainly what makes this story a journey to the main character.

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